School Values

School Values

It is well accepted that values are not taught to children, but are imbibed by them from the actions of the people they look up to, especially parents and teachers. Talking about what is good or bad without setting an example, would teach only hypocrisy and artifice. It is our attempt, therefore, to create a culture in the class-room and the school, where the values we consider important are naturally absorbed and practiced. They are listed below with the wish that parents will practice them at home so that children are not confused by mixed or contradicting signals.

School Values

It is well accepted that values are not taught to children, but are imbibed by them from the actions of the people they look up to, especially parents and teachers. Talking about what is good or bad without setting an example, would teach only hypocrisy and artifice. It is our attempt, therefore, to create a culture in the class-room and the school, where the values we consider important are naturally absorbed and practiced. They are listed below with the wish that parents will practice them at home so that children are not confused by mixed or contradicting signals.

Justice

Children have an innate sense of justice, which is frequently outraged by unfair treatment. Those frequently exposed to injustice, become cynical and learn that being ‘good’ does not matter. It will be our attempt to reinforce children’s natural sense of justice and idealism by providing as fair an environment as possible.

Despite having said that justice is the most desirable of virtues, we know that life is frequently unfair – starting from the accident, unequal birth to the natural inequalities of genetics. Our challenge is to give our children the sensitivity to recognize injustice; the courage to resist it wherever change is possible along with the wisdom to not let it immobilize them or make them cynical, whenever it must be accepted.

Justice

Children have an innate sense of justice, which is frequently outraged by unfair treatment. Those frequently exposed to injustice, become cynical and learn that being ‘good’ does not matter. It will be our attempt to reinforce children’s natural sense of justice and idealism by providing as fair an environment as possible.

Despite having said that justice is the most desirable of virtues, we know that life is frequently unfair – starting from the accident, unequal birth to the natural inequalities of genetics. Our challenge is to give our children the sensitivity to recognize injustice; the courage to resist it wherever change is possible along with the wisdom to not let it immobilize them or make them cynical, whenever it must be accepted.

Courage

We would like to teach our children to think for themselves and have the courage and integrity to stand up to opposition despite fear of ridicule or punishment. We discourage a ‘herd mentality’ and the blind following of the latest fads.

Self Esteem

We believe that every human being needs affection and appreciation, particularly at a young age. It is the responsibility of the home and school to provide these so that the child grows up secure and self-assured.

Affection must be given to every child unconditionally, so that she feels that she is loved no matter what. The child must be able to take this affection for granted even when she has done poorly in exams or not won the race.

Appreciation, on the other hand, must be moderated, so that a child does not have an exaggerated sense of herself or her work. Our aim is that our children grow up secure and confident but not brash and arrogant.

Concern for other people and civic sense

Our children are encouraged to be concerned about other people, willing to listen and help in time of need and behave with genuine good manners and respect irrespective of social hierarchies. Concern for other people would also extend to a civic sense and care of public property.

Concern for nature and other forms of life

Human beings tend to forget that the planet is home to other species as well, and their claim on the earth is just as valid as ours. Being perhaps the most intelligent species, we must show our intelligence not only in technological progress but also in preserving the planet and its many forms of life.
We teach our children to enjoy nature and thereby have the motivation to conserve it. We encourage them to develop habits which are environmentally friendly.

Aesthetic Sense

To live a civilized life, it is important for people to have a sense of aesthetics in its widest meaning. It may not be possible for all of us to be artists and performers but we can all appreciate beauty around us, whether natural or man-made. This may be in the form of a lovely garden, beautiful images, joyful music, a well-structured argument or even an elegant equation!

Aesthetics and design are important in everyday life. From the choice of what we wear and the arrangement of our homes, to the myriad products we buy, design is an element we respond to almost subconsciously. A well-developed sense of aesthetics will, we believe, go a long way in creating a more beautiful world.
Aesthetics extends to keeping our rooms tidy, our kitchens clean and our streets free of waste.

Discerning of Quality

Children must set high standards for themselves and be conscious of quality in every task they undertake and every choice they make. To enable this, we attempt to make our children thinking individuals, discerning about the world around them and their own work.

The satisfaction which goes with a job well done is a reward we would like all our children to experience. It is this, we believe, that should provide the motivation to do anything at all – whether work or play. Appreciation from others, golden stars, trophies and high marks are external motivators which we will use carefully so that they do not become an end in themselves.

Life Skills

Our children are encouraged to be concerned about other people, willing to listen and help in time of need and behave with genuine good manners and respect irrespective of social hierarchies. Concern for other people would also extend to a civic sense and care of public property.

  • The ability to concentrate is a skill which is talked about by everyone from parents and teachers to successful entrepreneurs, psychologists and spiritual gurus. Called by different names – focus, flow, mindfulness or being in the zone – this skill is a key element for enhanced performance as well as for greater serenity and contentment. We endeavour to provide a curriculum and an enabling atmosphere so that children develop the ability to focus on the task at hand, as well as enjoy keen engagement with what they learn.
  • The ability to think clearly and communicate with clarity The ability to think clearly is a critical skill. It enables us to cut through confusing and contradictory factors and make good decisions in personal and professional matters. Clear thinking is the most critical ingredient of effective communication. It is only too common for writers and speakers to be wordy without saying very much, to use showy vocabulary but be unable to get through to their readers or listeners. Clarity of thought and therefore clarity in communication gets to the heart of the matter with elegance and simplicity. It is an essential leadership skill. The school promotes spoken and written communication which reflect a clear and logical thought process.
  • Self-discipline is the ability to make yourself do what you know you should – when you don’t want to. It converts goals and dreams into accomplishments. We will give our students opportunities to develop habits of goal-setting, self-monitoring and self-assessment – skills which are particularly helpful, well after the discipline of parents and teachers is not there.
    It is our aim that equipped with the values and skills learnt early on in school and at home, our children will make the most out of life – for themselves and for the community, fulfilling the motto of Cambridge School – We Learn to Serve.
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